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Wednesday, Jul 28, 2021
Mugglehead Magazine
Cannabis & psychedelics industry news based in Vancouver, B.C.
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Canada

BC weed delivery provides access to store-less communities

While some municipalities have decided against retail cannabis, residents 19 and older can make their own choice

BC weed delivery provides access for store-less communities
Home delivery of BC bud starts July 15, boosting access to communities without retail stores. Submitted photo

Getting cannabis close to home will be easier now in some B.C. communities, as legal delivery is filling in where stores don’t exist.

Bringing back the pre-legalization mode of door delivery means that while city councils may not want regulated retail weed in their communities, the province has opened the door for them.

The provincial change announced last month kicks in Thursday, and the idea has been presented as another reason to buy from legal sellers.

Read more: Weed delivery coming to BC in July, but not all retailers sold on the idea

Read more: Testing pilot finds multiple contaminants in illicit BC bud

In communities around the Lower Mainland without weed stores, there are same-day delivery options.

ARCannabis COO Aaron Sinnathamby says they’re ready to “go big” and keep it green with two electric vehicles that will deliver from their five retail locations.

“Some local municipalities don’t want to offer dispensaries. Fine, then I guess they can resort to delivery,” he tells Mugglehead by phone. “On top of that, not everyone wants to or can drive, and it’s not convenient to just travel, especially if, say, you live in Surrey.”

‘Time for Surrey to take a step towards the modern world’

B.C. municipalities are responsible for retail locations and local rules, and some have decided against pot shops in their communities.

Delta is on track to bring in its first weed store and will look at others on a case-by-case basis. However, Richmond, Surrey and Burnaby haven’t welcomed cannabis stores yet.

But one surrey councillor suggests it might to time have the retail cannabis discussion again.

“It’s time for Surrey to take a step towards the modern world and start looking at this (retail cannabis) and not hide behind the veil of a lot of misinformation,” says Coun. Jack Hundial, adding he would like to see the discussion return to council.

“I’ve always supported responsible cannabis use in the city, but I think you certainly need to ask the public what they’re comfortable with as well.”

A few years into legalization, there are already well-established practices in B.C. that Surrey can and should look to as examples, Hundial continues.

He notes other cannabis stores in neighbouring cities of Langley and White Rock will be offering delivery as well.

It’s a monumental task to implement the delivery system, says Seed & Stone CEO Vikram Sachdeva. But he emphasizes that access is critical, noting many people use cannabis for pain management and to sleep.

“All these people that don’t have access, have a phone call away or five-minute line and the product is delivered to their door with a smile,” he says, adding budtenders will be handling delivery and can answer questions.

Both Sinnathamby and Sachdeva’s services cover the Lower Mainland.

Read more: West Vancouver set to approve first 4 pot shops

Read more: Delta, BC mostly pro-pot shop ahead of first store’s fate in July

For now, retailers are responsible for their own delivery structure, which could limit some sellers’ ability to include the service.

The use of third-party delivery services isn’t permitted, though stores have the option to deliver by vehicle, bike or on foot to residential addresses. The 30-gram limit of dried cannabis per transaction still applies.

“Cannabis was always delivered, and then it became an in-store experience,” Sinnathamby explains. “I’m sure everyone’s gonna be happy to have it.”

Mugglehead has reached out to Burnaby and Richmond city councils for comment.

 

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